Location & Hours

map

9270 Wicker Ave, Ste A
St. John, IN 46373

Monday Closed
Tuesday 10:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Wednesday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Friday 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Saturday 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Sunday Closed
 
Get Directions
hyperopia article
 

Hyperopia

Hyperopia and Myopia
Hyperopia is more commonly known as farsightedness. As the name suggests, people with farsightedness are able to focus on objects that are further away, but have difficulty focusing on objects which are very close. This is because the eyeball is shorter than normal, which prevents the crystalline lens in the eye from focusing correctly on the retina. About a fourth of the population is farsighted. Hyperopia can lead to chronic glaucoma, a more serious condition, later in life.

A family history of hyperopia is a risk factor for developing hyperopia. Babies are often born with hyperopia but they can usually outgrow the condition as their eyes develop into the correct shape.

Hyperopia can be corrected with eyeglasses or contact lenses. There are also new surgical procedures that can correct hyperopia.

 

Myopia

Myopia is the condition of being nearsighted. When it is an inherited condition, myopia begins early in life.  People with this condition can usually see near objects, but they struggle to see distant objects. Myopia is the opposite of hyperopia, or farsightedness.  In myopia, the anatomy of the eyeball, or globe, is longer than normal. This causes the light to focus in front of the retina, blurring the distance vision.  Myopia is corrected with glasses and contact lenses, or with laser vision correction. Laser vision correction is only recommended for people over 18 years old, when the eye has finished growing to adult size.

To correct the symptoms of myopia with glasses, lenses are used that are thicker on the edges and thinner in the middle. This is known as a concave lens, which can be cosmetically improved in higher prescriptions with a high index lens.

Myopes are also at increased risk for a retinal detachment. The signs and symptoms of a retinal detachment are flashing lights, black floaters, or a curtain over the vision. The risk of detachment is typically less than 3 percent.

Latest News

11 Bad Contact Lens Habits
Here are 11 bad contact lens habits we eye doctors often see-- #1 Sleeping in your contacts. This is the No. 1 risk factor for corneal ulcers, which can lead to severe vision loss and the need for a corneal transplant. Your cornea needs oxygen from the atmosphere because it...

Video Education Library

bcm_videoplayer_banner
 

More Videos

Our Mission Statement

To surpass your optical expectations by providing excellent service and quality products as well as gaining the trust of your entire family.

- ClearVue EyeCare Staff